Eights countries in 52 days on the Trans-Amazonian Challenge

Join us on a once in a lifetime adventure:

If you had 52 days to blaze your way through a bucket list motorcycle adventure tour across a single continent (in the true spirit of overland travel), which would you choose? 

In our minds, there’s no question. South America has it all. 

There is simply nowhere with the sheer volume of natural and historical world wonders, the mind-blowing diversity of landscapes, the amazing cities, fascinating cultures and crazily changeable riding conditions any other place can throw at you. All in the space of six weeks (we ride 42 out of the 52 days on this tour). 

On this tour you’ll climb 5,000m high mountain passes though before plummeting down to surf-splattered coasts and flat desert plain. 

Then of course, you’ll come face to face with the Amazon herself – the sacred rainforest whose breath sustains all life on earth. 

While this ride is named the Trans-Amazonian Challenge, it is really an exploration loop of the Northern Andes and the Amazon Basin, a 6,300,000 km area with eight countries flowing over its borders: 

Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Brazil, French Guiana, Suriname, Guyana and Venezuela. 

Yes, you will visit all these countries on this, the most exhilarating, challenging and mind-opening tour Motolombia has ever devised – all 8,000 miles (12,875km) of it.  

 Why Now is THE time to Get on a Bike and Experience Trans-Amazonian Challenge

With our matchless years of experience leading tour groups across some of the most gnarly terrain on god’s earth, Motolombia have successfully run the Trans-Amazonian Challenge in the past

The reason we’ve been able to run this huge undertaking is the unparalleled level of planning, safety and expert guidance we bring to what is logistically, physically and mentally an extremely demanding trip. 

But like every other tour company worldwide, the events of early 2020 have meant we’ve literally shut up shop for months, cancelled a string of tours and sadly had many customers pull the plug on their commitments. 

Our last Trans-Amazonian trip was scheduled for August 2020 but with things they way they were, we had to postpone the trip. While most of our riders booked on the 2020 have shifted to the 2021 departure, we still have spots up from grabs. 

So for those of you who’ve had your world motorcycle touring dreams crushed by the border closures and general terribleness of 2020, why not celebrate your freedom (when it finally arrives!)  in true, come-at-me, “I live for adventure” style? Put 9,000 miles between those months of bikeless boredom the pandemic has thrust up on you. After 52 insane, arduous and ridiculously fun days in the wilds of South America, you’ll won’t just have made up for “wasted time”. You’ll have had the time of your absolute life.  

Need Another Reason to Ride the Trans-Amazonian Now? 

Her Name is Amazonas

Not so subtly-sprinkled in among the all the Coronavirus news we’ve heard this year have been facts, rumours and opinions about the current Brazilian government’s plans to ramp up development in the Amazon region and basically not doing much (and probably the exact opposite) in the fight against illegal mining and logging operations. 

While this trip is called the “Trans-Amazonian”, the actual Trans-Amazonian Highway (or at least the most exciting stretch of it) is only one section of the entire route, there will be many other amazing section on the route like the almost entirely unvisited and most intact rainforests in the world, the Guiana Shield.  

What Exactly is the Trans-Amazonian Highway?

The part of the original early 1970s Trans-Amazonian Highway we ride on this tour was the road that effectively “opened up” the Amazon Rainforest to the rest of Brazil and the world at large. 

The Rodovia Transamazonica would be one of Brazil’s grandest infrastructure projects. As one of the world’s longest sealed highways, it would connect important port towns on the Atlantic to Brazil’s isolated inland villages and on to the untouched land, resources and riches that sure awaited in the Amazon itself. The highway would bring with it, mass migration, agriculture, development and opportunity, along with the unavoidable blight of large-scale environmental destruction.  

By 1972, the budget had been decimated. The Trans-Amazonian was opened prematurely, before the final 1,000km stretch to the Peruvian border had even started. Less than half of the highway had been paved as promised.  

Decades later, baring a few populated regions, the highway sees amazingly little use. The plots of land the government used to attract thousands of resettlers to be of incredibly poor quality. That, and the torrential monsoonal weather combined with predominantly sandy, red, rainforest soil, have made massive parts of the highway still impassable for a good chunk of the year. 

The Trans-Amazonian: Where we Ride 

We ride the TA in the dry season, and it is still one pig of a dusty, pot-holed, physically punishing and mental exhausting road (this is a “challenge” after all!)

Dirt hogs will relish the eventual conquest, but the surroundings of cleared forest and dilapidated farmland in some areas are eye opening. 

However we will get to ride the Trans-Amazonian’s longest stretch of untouched rainforest, which winds its way through deep, dark, dense, beautiful jungle within the Amazonia National Park, a sanctuary that has thus far been protected fiercely by the indigenous Kayapo community (who incidentally, are also exceptionally welcoming to eco-tourism).

With the battle for the Amazon truly reignited, the Trans-Amazonian Highway has once again become pivotal to the story.

Thanks to existing in one of the worst environments in the world for building anything quickly, construction on the road itself continues at a snail’s pace, but once such corridors into the rainforest’s interior do open, they allow for land-clearing on a rapid, industrial scale.

What About What’s on the News Right Now? Is the Amazon Being Destroyed? Will that Ruin my Trip? 

While most of the world only hears about the plight of the Amazon through the media, as a (hopefully curious, open-minded) foreigner on the ground, you will see what is happening with your own eyes. 

As riders, we too benefit from the construction of highways into tracts of previously pristine wilderness. For locals, some of these highways have been literally lifelines.

The balance between survival in the here and now and the future of the wider world is a game that is constantly being played out. If we want to call out those who are breaking the rules, isn’t it better that we understand the game first?  

Being present while it all unfolds, what you see, how you feel, which images and whose stories you bring back home can make far more difference than watching from a distance. 

You might want to hurry and be one of those people who gets to see the Brazilian Amazon “while it’s still there”. We don’t know how much time you’ve got, but we think that’s a valid reason to go travelling. Enough eco-oriented travellers spending at once can even keep that time limit indefinitely extended. 

So, if you’re concerned about some of the manmade ugliness that will undoubtedly be exposed, don’t despair, as there is so much beauty on this trip that remains completely unspoiled – sometimes even partly (or wholly) due to human protection. 

What will 2021 be like?

The Motolombia gang have done this trip before, but we believe 2021 will mark a new era of travel. No one really knows what it will look like yet. It’s possible on our day excursion to Machu Picchu, we’ll be some of the lucky few to see this majestic city enchantingly devoid of tourist crowds. Or (while less likely) the opposite could be true. 

It’s almost certain that less “typical” tourist destinations will still be in recovery. We expect attractions overall to be minimally crowded, even as we visit regions during their usual peak tourism period (other places on our itinerary of course, are never anything less than refreshingly quiet – Spring Break in Suriname anyone?!)

Remember, there are countless people, from shopkeepers to hotel owners to tour guides who live along the route we’ll be travelling, and rely heavily, if not completely on tourist income for survival. 

Writing this in mid-2020, I know that most of the folks you’ll meet on the 2021 Trans-Amazonia Challenge won’t have seen a foreign face for many, many months. We can only imagine outpourings of warmth and gratitude from both sides as we finally get to experience the beauty of international, intercultural interaction once again. 

And if adventure travel to you means gliding high above the clouds and sliding down in the dirt, all on one ridiculous all-terrain, no-terrain, white knuckle, border bunny-hopping ride of a freaking lifetime – don’t miss this chance to be an adventure moto-pioneer!

Written by: Fiona Davies (extreme pillion rider and adventure travel writer)

The Three Guianas – South America’s forgotten gems

Three Guianas

Uncovering the mysteries of South America’s forgotten gems

Contents:
1. A very short history of the Guianas
2. Why visit the Three Guianas
3. Culture of the Guianas
4. Destinations in Guiana
5. Getting to the Guianas
6. Ride the Guianas with Motolombia

As the world becomes more accessible and our planet seems to grow smaller, some of us feel a powerful desire to break new ground. To travel further.

In South America, there’s no better example of the “places that mass tourism forgot” than its three smallest nations, known collectively as the Three Guianas.

Strung side-by-side along South America’s north eastern Atlantic coast, the Three Guianas, from east to west, are Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana. Only French Guiana remains an overseas territory of France.

Guyana claimed independence from the British in 1975. The same year, Suriname rid itself of Dutch rule.

A very short history of the Guianas

Back in 1499, the Spanish first laid eyes on the mangrove-strewn coastline of the Guianas and its warrior-like Carib Indian inhabitants and didn’t particularly like what they saw.

The gold and silver hungry Spanish decided plundering the Guianas wasn’t worth the effort, although they did make the occasional slave raid.

When the Dutch, French and British began pushing south from the Caribbean, they were keen to stake out a piece of South America for themselves.

That really only left the Guianas, since Spain and Portugal had already claimed almost the entire continent.

The Netherlands began to settle the land in 1615, establishing trade in sugar, cocoa, tobacco and other prized commodities from the tropics. The indigenous workers they’d originally hired were quickly wiped out by introduced diseases, so the Dutch simply imported new sources of labour in the form of West African slaves.

After the second Anglo-Dutch War, under the 1667 Treaty of Breda, the Dutch retained modern-day Suriname and ceded the area east of the Maroni River to the French.

The next 150 years were marked by power struggles that saw sovereignty of the region shift between the colonists.

By 1800, Britain had established dominance in Suriname, although it remained under Dutch control.

At the end of the Napoleonic Wars, the Treaty of Paris reaffirmed Dutch sovereignty in Suriname, while Britain purchased the adjoining Dutch colonies, renaming them British Guyana.

In 1834, slavery was abolished in throughout the British Empire. Once again, the colonists found themselves seriously short on labour.

This triggered the next wave of immigrants, this time from the Asian colonies and
particularly India. Today, the Guianas are perhaps the countries with the most widespread mix of ethnic backgrounds in Latin America.

Today, Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana showcase overt Asian and Sub-
Continental influences, mixed in with European, Latin American and indigenous culture.

Why visit the Three Guianas?

You’ll never complain they’re “too touristy”

The Guianas remain three of South America’s least-visited countries.

That’s not because they’re not worth visiting (far from it). Tourism simply hasn’t been high on the agenda for these, until recently, agriculture-based economies.

Overshadowed by their big brother neighbour, Brazil, and home to exactly zero world
famous “bucket list” attractions, the Guianas remain obscure to just about everyone.

They’re full of incredible natural beauty, including one of the last pristine rainforests on earth

The Three Guianas form part of the 270 million-hectare Guiana Shield. Known as “the greenhouse of the world”, this globally important eco-region straddles the northern boundary of the Amazon Jungle.

Pristine forest covers around 80% of the Guiana Shield. It’s dense vegetation and mountain-fed rivers are a refuge for iconic species like the jaguar, black caiman, giant river otter and giant anteater.

Although the coasts of all three countries meet the warm northern Atlantic, if you’re
hoping for postcard-perfect beaches, you won’t find them in the Guianas.

Tangled mangroves dominate the coastline. Beyond them lie the Orinoco Delta
Swamp and Guiana Freshwater Swamp Forests, whose rivers muddy the seafront as they empty into the Atlantic.

Delving deeper into the wilds of the Three Guianas isn’t too easy. Only a few roads
connect the capitals to a handful of regional rural towns.

To hike this barely explored wilderness, with its sheer mountains, windswept
savannah, and countless waterfalls, the help of an expert tour operator is essential.

Slowly, ecotourism is making in-roads into the Guianas, while at the same time,
their economies are swiftly transitioning to being oil and mining based. In particular, Suriname’s recent gold boom looks to be setting the country on the path to widespread deforestation.

Culture of the Guianas

The mishmash of cultures that are glaringly evident in everyday life in the Guianas is nothing short of fascinating. Guyana, South America’s only English-speaking country, is home to the only two Test Cricket Grounds on the continent.

Guianan cuisine is a hodgepodge of influences garnered from the French, the Bushinengue (descendants of the West African and Caribbean slaves) and indigenous ingredients.

In the capitals, you’ll also see Chinese, Vietnamese and Indian eateries alongside
Creole restaurants and French patisseries.

Common ingredients include fresh seafood, smoked fish, cassava and a huge array
of tropical fruits.

Rum and a locally produced firewater called tafia are favoured local spirits.

Destinations in Guiana

Cayenne, French Guiana
Cayenne, a port city of roughly 138,000 inhabitants is the capital of French Guiana. It’s charming if run-down aesthetic in sharp contrast to its strong ties to the EU as well as French culture, law and order.

By far the most surprising addition to the city is the French European Space Centre. Also known as the Guiana Spaceport since 1964, it’s strategically located close to the equator and is where the French and European Space Agencies launch their satellites into orbit.

Paramaibo, Suriname
Laidback, tolerant and diverse, the capital of Suriname is built on a shell-sand reef over the Suriname River barely five metres above the ocean at low tide.

The city’s historic centre was granted UNESCO World Heritage status in 2002 for its fusion of European and local elements, particularly it’s distinctive Dutch colonial architecture. Lovely wooden cathedrals and grand government buildings add to the city’s slightly bizarre aesthetic appeal.

Check out the 17th century Fort Zeelandia and the bustling Central Markets,
overloaded with the morning’s seafood catch and food stalls serving cheap, freshly cooked Dutch-Indonesian favourites.

Georgetown, Guyana
Guyana’s capital (population 200,00), Georgetown runs at its own leisurely pace.
The closest city to the Caribbean, in its heyday, Georgetown was considered the “Garden City of the Caribbean”.

Georgetown boasts a vibrant contemporary street life, painting a curious contrast against a background of crumbling colonial mansions, overgrown parks, not-all-that-visited-museums and European churches.

Yet Georgetown is no sluggish backwater. The city is the headquarters of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), established to further economic development in the Caribbean nations, and its restaurant and nightlife precinct showcases a surprisingly cosmopolitan sensibility.

Beyond Georgetown
Georgetown is situated at the mouth of the Demerara, which originates some 346km inland in the central rainforests.

Georgetown is surrounded by lush tropical scenery, including the incredible Kaieteur Falls. The world’s largest single drop waterfall is approximately four times taller than Niagara Falls and is one of the most powerful waterfalls on earth.

Kaieteur Falls can be reached on a five day expedition by road/ferry from Georgetown, but most opt for a straightforward day trip from the city, taking one of the daily flights between Georgetown and the Kaiteur International Airport (more of an airstrip really, but just a 15 minute walk from the falls).

The Iwokrama Forest spans 3,710skm in the very heart of the Guiana Shield, one of the four last pristine tropical forests in the world. Tropical lowland forest covers much of the reserve, protecting some of the most species-rich habitat on earth.

The Burro-Burro River winds its way through the centre of the rainforest, while the 1,000m high Iwokrama Mountains form the geographical focal point of the park.

The Iwokrama Reserve is one of the only localities within the Shield to boast eco-tourism facilities. The Iwokrama River Lodge is a hub for sustainable tourism, research and conservation offering guided hikes, suspension bridge walks, wildlife-spotting boat cruises and treks to Turtle Mountain for panoramic views of the jungle canopy and the mountain ranges beyond.

Getting to the Guianas

By air
Most international flights into the Guiana capitals arrive from the Caribbean or Brazil.

Maintaining close ties to its French overseers, around a dozen flights per week from Paris to Cayenne.

Paramaibo and Amsterdam are still connected by direct flights. You can fly straight to Georgetown from New York, Miami, Port of Spain or Panama City.

Overland

If you’re reading this blog, you’re probably not interested in travelling to the Guianas
on some cushy European airline.

Reaching the Guianas overland is obviously way more fun, although not without its
challenges. You’ll need ride in on your own set of wheels, as there are no real options for obtaining a bike in the Guianas.

Brazil has the only open border crossings with all three of the Guianas (the Venezuela-Guyana crossing has been closed for years).

Most overlanders enter the Guianas by crossing from Oiapoque in Brazil to St Georges de L’Oyapock, 188km north of Cayenne.

The border towns are split in two by the Oyapock River. Crossing are done on motorised wooden boats, some of which can comfortably accommodate a couple of big bikes.

Once inside the Guianas, the highways between the capital cities are generally good. There aren’t too many roads heading inland, and the ones that are, are generally unpaved and guaranteed rough.

Rural traffic is pretty much limited to the odd 4WD or truck slowly grinding its way through the dirt. These roads cut a winding sliver out of incredibly dense forest surroundings, making for a spectacular off-road adventure.

Ride the Three Guianas with Motolombia

Getting to Guianas by motorcycle is both logistically challenge and a guaranteed work out for your off-road riding skills. Not many people do it.

With no real moto touring culture in the Guianas, solo travel can be difficult and somewhat risky if you find yourself broken down in the middle of the jungle! Motolombia is one of the only motorcycle touring specialists that visit the Guianas.

The Trans-Amazonian Challenge is just about the biggest, craziest adventure we offer, visiting eight countries in 52 days. We take off in late summer and follow the weather to get the best riding conditions possible.

But we call it a “challenge” for a reason! With plenty of off-road experience under your belt, this will be a trip of a lifetime!

Plus you can actually say you’ve been to the Guianas! If your buddies have no idea what you’re talking about, at least you know your little South American secret is their loss!

Written by: Fiona Davies (extreme pillion rider and adventure travel writer)

7 of South America’s most legendary motorcycling routes

When it comes to motorcycle travel, this enigmatic and hugely varied continent has it all. Riding the continent for weeks on end, it’s rare that any two days seem like “more of the same”. This is why South America is quite possibly the cream of the continental crop when it comes to bringing joy and exhilaration to a rider’s heart and wide grin beneath their helmet, day, after day, after day.

South America is virtually unmatched in its geological diversity, beginning in the Caribbean north of the equator and stretching all the way to the Antarctic Ocean.

A land of record-breaking extremes, it contains:

  • The mighty peaks of the Andes, the world’s longest continental mountain range
  • The Amazon jungle, the world’s largest tropical rainforest
  • The Atacama Desert, the driest place on the planet
  • 12 unique countries and hundreds of different ethnicities, languages and cultures

A network of epic highways and rural backroads traverse these magnificent landscapes.

Here are seven of the best of them.

ARGENTINA: Ruta 40

The 5,224km long National Route 40 is one of the world’s longest and most spectacular highways.

In the north, Ruta 40 begins at La Quiaca on the dusty, arid high plains of the Bolivian border. From there, the highway runs parallel with the spine of the Andean range to cross 11 provinces, 20 reserves and National Parks, 126 bridges and 26 mountain passes, reaching a maximum altitude of 5,061m. The highway stops where the land ends, at the southernmost continental tip of Cape Virgenes.

Heading south, things get twistier by the secon ads the route enters Patagonia through Bariloche and the picturesque alpine lake district.

Forging deeper into the Patagonian wilderness, the scenery grows more dramatic with every winding sweep of road, skirting past the jagged peaks of Monte Fitz Roy, the icebergs of Laguna de Los Tres and one of the stars of Patagonia, the Perito Moreno glacier, a groaning and creaking tower of brilliant white and cobalt blue where the Andes meets the Southern Ocean.

Ruta 40 is only partially paved, so don’t be surprised whenever that pristine tarmac suddenly turns into a pot-holed mess of grit and gravel.

We ride it on our: End of the World Expedition

CHILE: Carretera Austral – National Route CH-7

The silky smooth asphalt of the Chilean Route 5 of the Pan-American Highway a little tame for your tastes? Take the road less travelled and ride the north-south length of Chilean Patagonia on the sublime Carretera Austral (Route CH-7).

Most of its 1,240km length sees little traffic, as the highway passes through the most sparsely populated regions in the country.

A series of swooping curves, tricky up and downhill bends and serpentine mountainside paths, the mind-blowing Patagonian scenery transforms every other day, from beautiful beech forest to glacial lakes locked in by snow-tipped mountain chains, rugged steppe and river rapids gushing between steep-sided canyons and verdant alpine valleys.

To date, only around 40% of the highway is paved, mainly in the north.  The remaining portion is mainly gravel – gentle in some parts and thoroughly bone-shaking in others.

We ride it on our: End of the World Expedition

BOLIVIA: North Yungas Road (aka “Death Road”) – National Route 3

Cut into the side of the Cordillera Oriental Range is a zig-zagging gravel goat track linking the Andean capital of La Paz with the Yungas region in the Bolivian Amazon.

The single lane North Yungas Road has earned international infamy as “the most dangerous road on earth”. Its 60km length includes 29 hairpin bends and a heart-stopping 3,500m of descent, and the rain and fog is almost ever-present. A mere 3.2 wide road lies straddles the sides of the mountain and its sheer precipices, plunging a kilometre below into a graveyard of scattered wreckage.

Before a paved, dual lane alternative opened in 2006, landslides and collisions often claimed hundreds of lives every year. These days, the old route is one of Bolivia’s best-known attractions, with downhill mountain biking attracting thousands of daredevil tourists to what’s now an otherwise rarely used road.

If you’re attempting the Death Road on a motorcycle, you’ll need solid off-roading skills to manage the precariously slippery surfaces, drenched in parts by cliffside waterfalls that tumble directly on to the road below.

The climb from the steamy foothills of Yolosa to the stark, windswept La Cumbre Pass (4,650m) is thrillingly beautiful. Now and then, the mist periodically lifts to reveal breathtaking views over the altiplano and the vast expanse of the Amazon Rainforest.

We ride it on our: End of the World Expedition

COLOMBIA: Alto de Letras – National Route 50

Between the small towns of Mariquita and Chinchina in Colombia’s verdant coffee triangle is a sealed stretch of highway with a rather interesting reputation. The almost impossibly steep route, which crosses the Alto de Letras mountain pass, is notorious among cycling community as reputedly the longest climb in the cycling world, boasting a punishing elevation gain of 3,800m in just 80km!

If you’re attempting this route on a bicycle, you might be in too much agony to really appreciate the scenery, which would be a shame – it is absolutely beautiful. With the benefit of an engine, the almost sheer vertical ascents and stomach-surging drops provide blasts of pure riding euphoria.

The 140km route begins just 485m above sea level, surrounded by lush tropical vegetation.  Soon you’ll begin ascending above the clouds and with luck, on approaching the mist might part to reveal tantalising glimpses of the permanently ice-capped peak of Nevado del Ruiz, the fifth highest in Colombia at 5,311m.

We ride it on the these: 6 Colombian tours.

BRAZIL: Trans-Amazonian Highway – National Route BR-230

Before the early 1970s, only the tiniest fraction of the great Amazon Jungle rainforest was accessible to outsiders. All that changed when the Trans-Amazonian Highway effectively sliced the interior of the then-pristine rainforest in half. The legacy of the 4,000km long Trans-Amazonian isn’t exactly a proud one, having essentially marked the beginning of the Amazon’s deforestation crisis.

Grand visions of a paved highway from the Atlantic Coast to the Peruvian border never came to fruition, thanks to lack of funding, the annual October-March monsoon and the unstable nature of the rainforest’s red soil. Lately, plans to revive the route to Peru seem to be slowly coming together, but the road remains largely unsealed to this day.

Less than half of the highway actually lies within the Amazon jungle itself. The eastern portion traverses through the mostly dry, uninspiring north-eastern interior.

The western half is far more preferable. You’ll quickly come up against properly remote, properly challenging, dirt, mud and river-forging adventure riding. The longest stretch of wilderness slithers through the Amazonia National Park, home to iconic Amazon critters like macaws and spider monkeys.

We ride it on our: Trans-Amazonian Challenge

PERU: Desert Coast to Central Andes – Route of the Liberators (Route 28A)

Peru is packed with so many ridiculously scenic road trips, particularly among the soaring mountain passes of the Andes. For our money though, some of South America’s most unique and varied scenery can be covered in a single day. Just take virtually routes east from the rugged Pacific coast south of Lima, through the dunes of the coastal deserts and then up, up, up into the high grasslands of the Central Andes.

It’s hard to beat the 340km ride that starts in the sublime desert oasis of Huachachina, then cuts west to the port town of Pisco. From Pisco, begin your ascent from sea level up National Highway 28A, also known as Via de los Liberatores, as it was this brutal route followed by Simon Bolivar’s volunteer army during Peru’s liberation from Spain. Crosss a soaring 4,750m pass before descending into the colonial city of Ayacucho (2750m).

We ride it on our: Motopichu Best of Peru Tour

ECUADOR: Cotopaxi Volcan Road – Pan-American Highway (National Route 35)

Just south of Quito, this section of the Pan-American Highway is only 40km long but it’s a pothole-riddled pig of a road, all rutted gravel and sandy grit. Road maintenance isn’t  a high priority in Ecuador, so it’s no surprise that the route to Cotopaxi National Park is one of the gnarliest on the Pan-American. Streams flowing directly over the road and have a tendency to flash-flood, making the route even more challenging

That said, the narrow passage alongside Ecuador’s Valley of Volcanoes is visually stunning – an ever-changing outlook switching between dense forest, lunar-like altiplano landscapes and high tundra bursting with multi-coloured wildflowers. As the road skirts the western edge of the park, jaw-dropping panoramas of the open grassland and Mount Cotopaxi come into view. A classically conical volcano with a permanently snow-crowned summit, it’s Ecuador’s second highest peak at 5,879m.

We ride it on both our: South American Express and Galapagos Evolution Tour

GROUP TOURS IN SOUTH AMERICA

No one knows the great riding routes of South America like the team at Motolombia. A guided group tour is one of the most enjoyable, safe and seamless ways to visit some of the most remote regions in the content.

Check out the following tours which feature many of the world-class riding routes described above:

Written by: Fiona Davies (extreme pillion rider and adventure travel writer)

RENT A MOTORCYCLE IN COLOMBIA

Rent Motorcycle Colombia

The Final Frontier: Trans Amazonian Challenge

52 Days, 8,000 Miles, Eight Fascinating Countries

South America’s reputation as a motorcycle touring paradise is legendary. This single continent encompasses all the ingredients of the motorcycle journey of a lifetime. And we’re not just talking about the roads themselves, as intoxicatingly thrilling and enchanting as they are.

What makes a long-distance journey through this continent of extremes a truly unforgettable experience is every part of the adventure combined. In a few days riding, you’ll discover an incredible richness and diversity of cultures, a friendly and welcoming local people, and landscapes that are both instantly dramatic and thrillingly changeable from day to day – from the world’s longest mountain range to dry desert canyons, wind-swept coastline and lush rainforests, teeming with wildlife

Introducing Motolombia’s Trans Amazonian Challenge

Every year, around the beginning of summer, an intrepid crew of riders take part in Motolombia’s Trans Amazonian Challenge. This expertly guided and fully supported tour takes in eight countries in 52 Days, from the coffee-covered hills of Colombia’s evergreen Andean lowlands to the towering snow peaks of Peru and Ecuador to the mysterious ‘Three Guianas’ on the northern Atlantic Coast to the pink dolphin-inhabited Amazonian waterways of Brazil and the towering tropical falls of Venezuela.

Forty-two of these days will involve riding, almost entirely on some of the most epic motorcycling roads on the planet.

We understand that for most people, a ride like this is a truly once-in-a-lifetime adventure.

We know what you’re thinking. If you’re undertaking a 12,875km (8,000 mile) journey from the northern Andean mountains of Colombia to the Amazon Basin and beyond, you had damn well better be having the time of your life!

It’s not all that often that you get 52 days in a single year to just go out and ride into the wilderness, so we’ve planned a route that packs more diverse and spectacular scenery into 52 days than seems geographically possible.

No two days are ever the same, and we can almost guarantee that every day be full of sights, scenes and moments where one can scarcely believe their own eyes.

Who is Motolombia’s Trans Amazonian Challenge For?

First and foremost, we schemed up the Trans Amazonian Challenge with the serious adventure motorcycle rider in mind.

Because this tour is about showing you the absolute very best of the enormously diverse northern region of South America, we regularly leave the comfort of the tarmac and venture on to remote backroads and rarely used mountain trails. As any off-road rider knows, take that turn off and you never know what sort of conditions lie ahead until their staring you in the face.

You’ll reach altitudes of over 5,000m climbing (with two wheels and an engine thankfully!) the freezing cold Andean passes.

When we hit the rainforest (although it is technically the dry season) – it’s a safe bet you’re gonna get rain – so expect all kinds of mud-related mayhem, with high humidity and sweltering summer temperatures thrown into the mix.

If all this sounds like great fun, the Trans Amazonian might just be for you. In order to join this tour, it’s s essential that you are a highly skilled, continuously practiced long-distance rider. Some days can get extremely physical, so it’s important that you’re fit, healthy condition, with plenty of off-road experience under your belt.

This type of ride requires both individual stamina and social and teamwork qualities conducive to teamwork. Only with each other’s support can we make sure any obstacles are navigated around safely and each individual rider is given the help they need.

Do I Need My Own Bike?

Because of the duration of this expedition and the at times highly demanding terrain, many riders prefer to bring their own bikes, either shipping them out to Colombia or riding them from elsewhere in the Americas.

If you wish to bring your own bike, we welcome you as well, as taking on this type of tour with a machine you’re comfortable and familiar with will help you get set up and acclimated to the conditions and riding styles far more easily.

Of course, not everyone can bring their own motorcycle halfway across the road with relative ease, so a variety of late-model hire bikes, fresh out of the Motolombia garages are available to rent.

Can Non-Riders Still Come Along for the Journey?

Pillions: Riders, you can take a pillion, provided they’ll put up with nearly two months of some seriously bone-rattling off-road riding, and a considerable amount of dust, mud and general filth.

As a self-proclaimed “professional pillion rider”, my advice to anyone thinking of accompanying their soul mate or best motorcycle-riding buddy on this trip is to make sure you’re super comfortable first with long days of riding pillion on rough and often extremely windy roads. And be prepared to give massages to aching necks, backs and arms at the end of the day.

4X4 Passengers: On this tour, our motorcycle convoy will be escorted from the rear by a 4×4 support vehicle. Pillion riders can join our expert driver over the same roads and trails our riders will be using if they need a rest from the bike.

Introducing Motolombia’s Trans Amazonian Challenge

Every year, around the beginning of summer, an intrepid crew of riders take part in Motolombia’s Trans Amazonian Challenge. This expertly guided and fully supported tour takes in eight countries in 52 Days, from the coffee-covered hills of Colombia’s evergreen Andean lowlands to the towering snow peaks of Peru and Ecuador to the mysterious ‘Three Guianas’ on the northern Atlantic Coast to the pink dolphin-inhabited Amazonian waterways of Brazil and the towering tropical falls of Venezuela.

Forty-two of these days will involve riding, almost entirely on some of the most epic motorcycling roads on the planet.

We understand that for most people, a ride like this is a truly once-in-a-lifetime adventure.

We know what you’re thinking. If you’re undertaking a 12,875km (8,000 mile) journey from the northern Andean mountains of Colombia to the Amazon Basin and beyond, you had damn well better be having the time of your life!

It’s not all that often that you get 52 days in a single year to just go out and ride into the wilderness, so we’ve planned a route that packs more diverse and spectacular scenery into 52 days than seems geographically possible.

No two days are ever the same, and we can almost guarantee that every day be full of sights, scenes and moments where one can scarcely believe their own eyes.

Who is Motolombia’s Trans Amazonian Challenge For?

First and foremost, we schemed up the Trans Amazonian Challenge with the serious adventure motorcycle rider in mind.

Because this tour is about showing you the absolute very best of the enormously diverse northern region of South America, we regularly leave the comfort of the tarmac and venture on to remote backroads and rarely used mountain trails. As any off-road rider knows, take that turn off and you never know what sort of conditions lie ahead until their staring you in the face.

You’ll reach altitudes of over 5,000m climbing (with two wheels and an engine thankfully!) the freezing cold Andean passes.

When we hit the rainforest (although it is technically the dry season) – it’s a safe bet you’re gonna get rain – so expect all kinds of mud-related mayhem, with high humidity and sweltering summer temperatures thrown into the mix.

If all this sounds like great fun, the Trans Amazonian might just be for you. In order to join this tour, it’s s essential that you are a highly skilled, continuously practiced long-distance rider. Some days can get extremely physical, so it’s important that you’re fit, healthy condition, with plenty of off-road experience under your belt.

This type of ride requires both individual stamina and social and teamwork qualities conducive to teamwork. Only with each other’s support can we make sure any obstacles are navigated around safely and each individual rider is given the help they need.

Do I Need My Own Bike?

Because of the duration of this expedition and the at times highly demanding terrain, many riders prefer to bring their own bikes, either shipping them out to Colombia or riding them from elsewhere in the Americas.

If you wish to bring your own bike, we welcome you as well, as taking on this type of tour with a machine you’re comfortable and familiar with will help you get set up and acclimated to the conditions and riding styles far more easily.

Of course, not everyone can bring their own motorcycle halfway across the road with relative ease, so a variety of late-model hire bikes, fresh out of the Motolombia garages are available to rent.

Can Non-Riders Still Come Along for the Journey?

Pillions: Riders, you can take a pillion, provided they’ll put up with nearly two months of some seriously bone-rattling off-road riding, and a considerable amount of dust, mud and general filth.

As a self-proclaimed “professional pillion rider”, my advice to anyone thinking of accompanying their soul mate or best motorcycle-riding buddy on this trip is to make sure you’re super comfortable first with long days of riding pillion on rough and often extremely windy roads. And be prepared to give massages to aching necks, backs and arms at the end of the day.

4X4 Passengers: On this tour, our motorcycle convoy will be escorted from the rear by a 4×4 support vehicle. Pillion riders can join our expert driver over the same roads and trails our riders will be using if they need a rest from the bike.

What Should I Most Look Forward To?

The reason we’ve chosen this part of South America for our 52-day circuit (starting and ending in our homebase of Cali, Colombia) is because it has absolutely everything.

If you want a run-down of the famous attractions, World Heritage archaeological sites, colourful cities and stunning natural landmarks you’ll witness on this expedition, head to our Trans Amazonian Challenge tour page. for a reasonably comprehensive list of “goalposts”.

Remember, this is an anything-can-happen, remote area expedition, and routes and destinations can change on the fly, should weather or road conditions decide to throw a spanner in the works.

Yes, we’ll be visiting the Nazca Lines, Machu Picchu, the Amazon River Basin and Angel Falls and every one of them will absolutely blow your mind.

But you’ll be equally moved by the warmth and friendliness of the South American people, from the villagers allowing a glimpse into their age-old traditions to guests who visit few and far between, to the exhilarating pace and permanently festive atmosphere of the metropolises.

While lots of guests begin their journey most keen on getting to the “bucket list” sites, they end up taking away is much more than a checklist of destinations.

What makes the Trans Amazonian Challenge not just a tour, but a genuine adventure is that this is a rite of passage of sorts. A secret journey shared by a tight-knit band of like-minded travellers, venturing into lands few outsiders have ever looked upon.

It’s the riding itself, the unpredictability the teamwork and the camaraderie that develops over a 52-day journey that’s tough, exciting and full of moments of overwhelming beauty and intensity. It’s sense of both individual accomplishment and shared experiences, that make the Trans Amazonian Challenge what it is.

And what it is, is not just one of the coolest two-wheeled expeditions in all of South America, but the journey of an absolute lifetime.

Other Things to Know

For more practical info – prices, inclusions, accommodation, optional activities, and (maybe soon) a possible start date for 2020 (subject to change according to weather conditions), you’ll find most of what you need over at the Trans Amazonian Challenge tour page.

More information will be added closer to the proposed kick-off date. It’ll be here before you know it, so register your interest ASAP.

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Introducing Motolombia’s Guided 4WD Tours

Now You Can Explore the Most Beautiful Parts of Colombia by 4WD

Motolombia started out as a motorcycle tour and rental company to help introduce motorcyclists to the beauty of Colombia – and in particular, its off-the-beaten track destinations. We’re talking about the sorts of places where busloads of tourists rarely venture. Not because they’re not worthy of outside attention, but quite often because they’re not so easy to reach by conventional means. But with the right set of wheels, entire parts of the country suddenly ae unlocked, making so much more of the country free to be explored.

But what if you can’t, or don’t want to ride through Colombia on a motorbike?

We’ve always felt that anyone with an adventurous spirit and a desire to see the “other” side of Colombia should still have the opportunity to visit some of these amazing but hard to get to destinations.

So, in the spirit of encouraging more intrepid souls to see Colombia beyond the “Gringo Trail”, the team at Motolombia have put together a series of 4WD guided expeditions.

The idea

Join a guided 4×4 tour, leave the driving to the experts, and see the best of “hidden” Colombia, without having to worry about getting lost or the joys of roadside “makeshift mechanicking”. Colombia is an adventure traveller’s paradise, and if you can’t go adventuring on two wheels, we say do it on four wheels! And if they’re the kind of wheels that eat dirt, mud and sand for breakfast, all the better!

Guided 4WD Tours in Colombia – Why They Are Awesome

Colombia is a country of wild, empty coastlines, remote deserts, immense mountain ranges and vast tracts of uninhabited montane forest and jungle. The sheer number of different ecosystems and wildly varying landscapes all connected with one densely concentrated patchwork make Colombia one of the most biodiverse countries on earth. It’s a country in which long-distance travel is extremely rewarding. Certainly, with some planning, it’s possible to travel throughout much of Colombia without your own transport When it comes to overland travel, your main options are:

Traveling in Colombia by bus

The majority of visitors to Colombia make use of the country’s network of public buses to travel long distances between locations, and there’s a lot to be said for that. They’re a cheap, comfortable and easy method for visiting just about all of the major cities and popular attractions in Colombia.

However, bus travel is frequently slow in Colombia. The humble autobus isn’t built for speed and agility on those twisty mountain roads (i.e. Colombia’s main highways). Then there are the inevitable traffic jams, endless passenger pick-ups, numerous roadside pit stops (always in the most uninspiring places imaginable).

Long distance travel by bus takes time (sometimes much more than the timetable/guidebook advises) and there are some places an ostensibly city and highway only vehicle simply can’t venture.

Travelling by private vehicle in Colombia

Travelling in a private vehicle shortens those huge distances considerably, allowing you to see so much more in a shorter space of time.

For those unwilling to rent and a vehicle drive themselves (understandable, given the challenging and unfamiliar conditions the first-time traveller to Colombia would find themselves up against), one option is to hire a private car and driver.

However, for long distances, this is prohibitively expensive for most travellers. Travelling in a small group can make journeying by private vehicle considerably more affordable.

Touring in a 4WD isn’t a necessity in Colombia. All the major highways are sealed and well-maintained, as are roads through the cities and many secondary roads throughout much of the country.

But some of the most spectacular places in Colombia simply can’t be accessed, or fully appreciated by conventional vehicle.

Reaching natural wonders like the incredible ‘rainbow river’ Caño Cristales, the cloud forests near Florencia and the sand dunes of Guajira desert without your own transport would mean navigating a series of plane, bus or taxi journeys, before making the rest of your way there on foot.

Instead, you could go the fastest way, which also happens, by far to be the most fun way! Overland, off-road in a mighty, mountain conquering Motolombia 4WD!

Mountains, Coasts and Jungles – Choose Your Own Adventure

To date, Motolombia have launched three separate, 10 guided 4WD tours, all covering completely unique parts of Colombia. Every tour includes an expert guide-driver per truck, all road-related expenses and accommodation. Each truck takes a maximum of three passengers. All trucks are air conditioned, all-terrain vehicles – trust us, this is as comfortable as off-roading in Colombia gets! Check out the 4WD Tour page for detailed information including full itineraries. Here’s a brief summary of what’s on offer.

10 Day Carribean Desert Tour

From the colourful colonial city of Cartagena, this tour takes you out of the hustle and bustle of the tropical tourist town to some of the wildest coastline in the entire Caribbean. As you leave the resorts far behind, a surreal landscape of barren deserts, orange sandhills, turquoise coves and vivid blue ocean begin to open around you.

  • Not far from town, the real fun begins, as we spend around 70% of our drive-time off-road!
  • Imagine driving for hours without so much as a building in sight – just empty beaches, crashing waves, arid deserts and hundreds of bird species (including the pink flamingos of Punta Gallinas).
  • We cross La Guajira with the blessing of the Wayuu people. This is their land and we’ll attempt to learn a little of their culture and history while visiting some of the local communities.
  • Guajira is famous for its massive coastal sand dunes. Drive to the top or test your stamina trudging up the crests for sensational views of the ocean and its otherworldly desert surroundings.
  • Experience epic 4×4 beach driving, fresh lobster dinners, tackle the Caribbean waves on a kite surf, and sleep in hammocks under a pristine star-studded sky.  (View Tour details)

10 Day Amazon Jungle Tour

This adventure tour focuses on the rarely visited south-central and eastern parts of Colombia, where the Andes meet the Amazon rainforest. 

  • From the handsome “White City” of Popayan and the mysterious ancient statues of San Agustin Archaeological Park, we’ll traverse magnificent mountain roads descending into the lowlands and the heart of the Colombian wilderness.
  • Go for rambling drive along jungle roads through the mist-shrouded cloud forests near Florencia.
  • From La Macarena, it’s near full-day’s trek on foot through the forest to reach Caño Cristales. Bursting with vibrant reds, pinks, yellows, oranges and greens caused by blooming aquatic flowers, the locals sometimes refer to this natural wonder of the world as the River of the Gods.
  • From the steamy jungles of La Macarena, we’ll experience an incredible transformation in the scenery as we enter the Tatacoa Desert, where we’ll spend a night glamping beneath the stars.
  • After driving from the desert to the Andean foothills, we’ll overnight in Colombia’s famous zona cafetera, home to giant wax palms and sprawling coffee plantations. (View Tour details)

10 Day Andean Mountain Tour

We’ve built a little more comfort into this luxury tour of Colombia’s scenic Andean region, crisscrossing the smooth, paved highways between some of the most enchanting Colonial villages in the country. With just a few minor sections of dirt to navigate, this trip is perfect for folks who want to get off the tourist trail and experience the authentic, rural side of Colombia without sacrificing on comfort.

  • Take a guided stroll through a working coffee plantation, soak in the waterfall pools of the gorgeous hot springs of Santa Rosa de Cabal, tour the bizarre former ranch of Pablo Escobar and explore Jardin, one of the most beautiful towns in the coffee region.
  • You’ll sleep soundly in the best hotels every night, but the highlight of this tour is undoubtedly the jaw-dropping scenery that awaits around every turn. If the weather is clear, you may even see all the way to the summit of the active volcano Nevado del Ruiz. Soaring to 5,311m above sea level, this fearsome Andean giant is one of the highest peaks in Colombia.  (View Tour details)
 

8 Must-See Places in Colombia with Amazing Natural Scenery

As one of the most bio-diverse countries on earth, Colombia is made up of an incredible patchwork of wildly differing landscapes and extraordinary natural beauty. From awe-inspiring mountain ranges to mysterious cloud forest, scorching desert and rugged, surf-spattered coast, here are eight of Colombia’s most awe-inspiring natural wonders.

1. Caño Cristales

Cano cristales

Deep in the dense forests of the Sierra de la Macarena National Park lies a river with a beauty so strange and unearthly it has been called “the river that ran away from paradise”. More co mmonly, it’s referred to as “el rio de los cinco colores” (the river of five colours), since for several months each year (usually between mid-May and early December), the pools and cascades of the Caño Cristales become liquid rainbows. Bursting with vibrant reds, pinks, yellows, oranges and greens, the phenomenon is caused by the blooms of the aquatic flower, macarenia clavigera.
In an isolated range, the Sierra de la Macarena is a vast, wild tract of mixed forest, tropical jungle, shrubland and savannah. Until the mid-2000s, it was a known guerrilla hideout and completely closed to tourists.
These days, tourists can hop on a direct flight from Bogota to the small town of La Macarena, and from there enjoy a half-day hike, boat and truck trip to Caño Cristales and the surrounding swimming holes and waterfalls. Guides are mandatory inside the park and are easily hired in town.
Hardcore dirt riders can visit Caño Cristales on a guided 9 day tour with Motolombia, but heed the warning: this one’s for expert off-roaders only!

2. The Cocora Valley

Cocora valley

Beautiful scenery is everywhere in Colombia’s coffee region. Jade green mountain ranges, forested hills and verdant meadows abound. But one place in the Coffee Triangle stands out, not because it’s unlike anywhere else in the region, but because it’s unlike anywhere else on the planet.
Just east of Salento, the Cocora Valley sits in the lower reaches of the Los Nevados National Park, a broad, perennially lush valley framed by sharp peaks. What makes this valley, also known as el Bosque de Palmas (Forest of the Palms) is that sprouting out of the ground in every direction are the gigantic palma de cera (giant wax palms), the largest palms in the world and Colombia’s national tree.
Some of these strange, spindly giants (their smooth, cylindrical trunks are naked, bearing just a crown of leafy fronds at the top) tower an incredible 60m high. Seeing hundreds of these majestic trees scattered across this resplendent valley is a sight to behold. Measuring yourself up at the base of one of these behemoths and you’ll appreciate how truly tiny you appear in their presence. This is a rain-soaked region, and some days a thick, swirling mist descends on the valley. Some say the foggy weather makes Cocora even more beautiful, shrouding the valley with a mysterious, almost prehistoric air.

3. Chicamocha National Park and Chicamocha Canyon

Chicamocha canyon

54 km south of Bucaramanga, Chicamocha is a bit of a sidestep from the typical Gringo Trail, but it’s a region experienced Colombian adventure riders know and love. The park is bounded by the spines of the mountainous chain surrounding the Chicamocha Canyon.
227 km long and around 2 km deep, Chicamocha is a lush and fertile canyon, with undulating slopes carpeted in emerald green vegetation. The Chicamocha River races along the bottom in a series of rapids, which have recently gained the attention of whitewater rafters. Being not so far from San Gil, Colombia’s ‘adventure capital’ a small adventure sports industry around paragliding, climbing and camping started offering activities within the park.
There are some great day hikes and multi-day treks within the park, but for motorcyclists, it’s the 50km, 45A Route from Piedecustra to Aratoca that makes this natural wonder well worth a detour. The road winds its way along the high ridges before descending almost to the canyon floor. For a remote rural Colombia road, its surface is almost unbelievably perfect. The curves seem to go on forever, and the views are something else altogether.

4. Tayrona National Park

Tayrona national park

At its southern edges, the forests of Tayrona creep up the foothills of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta mountain range. At its northern boundaries, it meets the wide bays and picturesque coves of a rugged, undeveloped slice of the Caribbean coast. To many, Tayrona is the very definition of paradise. For a beach destination with sparkling clear water and idyllic, palm-fringed stretches of white sand, Tayrona has no equals in mainland Colombia.
If you’re an avid wildlife spotter or birdwatcher, a few days exploring Tayrona’s hiking trails is a must. It’s home to a tiny primate called the cotton-topped tamarin, as well as howler monkeys, sloths, iguanas and poison dart frogs.
However, beauty has a downside. Tayrona can suffer from overcrowding, especially in the peak December-January tourist season. A sacred site to the indigenous Kogi people, Tayrona needs protection. To help the local environment recover, the park often closes for weeks directly after the peak season.

5. Tatacoa Desert

Tatacoa desert

Between Bogota and San Agustin is one of Colombia’s most surreal natural wonders. Desierto de la Tatacoa is a rugged, scorching badland. Its dry, rocky canyons form a labyrinth of eroded red cliffs and gullies. Bizarre, towering rock formations punctuate the arid landscape, which appears hauntingly void of life apart from the occasional giant cactus.
Once the hot desert sun has set, Tatacoa becomes an amazing stargazing destination. In this part of the country, there is little to no light pollution, so on clear nights, an astonishing number of stars are made dazzlingly visible. Home to an astronomical observatory, at 6:30 pm each night, you’ll have the opportunity to see the stars through a high powered telescope, with the local astronomer on hand to point out the constellations.

6. Colombia’s Pacific Coast

Pacific Colombia

Beach vacations in Colombia are synonymous with the Carribean, but Colombia (the only South American country with both Atlantic and Pacific Ocean coastline) has an entire, separate and largely-forgotten coast lapping at its western shores. The Pacific Coast of Colombia extends for 1,392 km, with the Chocó department claiming the longest stretch of seafront.
This is one of the least developed regions in Colombia, the complete opposite of the manicured attractiveness and tame beaches of the Carribean resorts. In Chocó, where the sand ends, the jungle begins. Deep inside the rainforest, waterfalls stream over mossy ledges to crash into wild rivers below. Thermal pools, hidden sanctuaries in the jungle, wait to be discovered by only the most intrepid and foot-sure adventurers. Most settlements on the Chocó coast, tiny fishing villages are isolated and poor. A lack of infrastructure makes travel here a fairly challenging prospect.
Still, modest steps are being made towards lifting-up the region’s economy through eco-tourism. The wild waves of the rugged Chocó coast harbour epic secret surf breaks. The region too, is rich in wildlife – most notably dolphins, turtles and the humpback whales who hug the Colombian coastline on their yearly migration. Whales can often be spotted from shore, but for an up close encounter, head out on a boat tour during the June to October whale watching season.

7. The Sand Dunes of La Guajira

Guajira desert

There is no place remotely like La Guajira, a tiny coastal region on the northernmost tip of Colombia, where the desert touches the Caribbean Sea. The arid landscapes of La Guajira have a desolate, almost alien beauty – cracked yellow earth, straggly clumps of cactus and tiny settlements of tin and thatched roof houses.
And then, the parched, hard earth of the plains gives way to a vast expanse of windswept sand, whose edges plummet precipitously into the crashing waves of the Atlantic below. Standing atop one of these towering dunes, you’ll find yourself gazing in wonder over the blue waters of the Caribbean and the red cliffs of the Guajira desert. This the land of the nomadic Wayuu people. The Spanish never succeeded in conquering this harsh environment and to this day, the Wayuu have managed to maintain a large part of their traditional lifestyle and culture.

8. Chicaque Natural Park

Chicaque Natural Park

The cloud forests of Chicaque remains an untouched wilderness, despite being just 30 minutes south of the crowded capital of Bogota. Well and truly in the clouds, at around 2,700m above sea level, the protected private reserve boasts some of the most magical forest scenery anywhere in Colombia. Some 300 bird species call Chicaque home, as do a dozen different mammals, including the two-toed sloth and spectacled bear.
An amazing ecotourism destination, Chicaque features miles of magnificent hiking trails, varied accommodation and numerous activities. Inside the park are nine well-marked ecological trails. It also offers a canopy walk at the top of a 200 year old oak tree, ziplines, horseback riding and guided birdwatching tours.

Written by: Fiona Davies (extreme pillion rider and adventure travel writer)

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